November, 2009

16 Posts
When Artists Dry Up
What makes great creators go silent? And is it always a bad thing?  
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Harvard Examines Opening Night
The Harvard musicologist Thomas Kelly teaches a popular course, First Nights, where students study the first nights of five different pieces of music – their history, cultural context, composition, libretto, rehearsals and how the audience reacted.  
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Robbins Landon
Distinguished musicologist known for his trailblazing work on Haydn and his books on Mozart  
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Percussion Moves to Center Stage
When Jonathan Haas set out to pursue a career as a solo percussionist 30 years ago, he knew he was in for a struggle. At Juilliard, he was at first barred from giving a recital—a requirement for students of any
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Recounting The History Of Opera – One Tweet At A Time
How many tweets does it take to cover the entire span of opera history? The San Diego Opera wants to find out and has launched a Twitter project in which it will tweet about everything from Monteverdi to Mozart to
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A Key for Unlocking Memories
Music Therapy Opens a Path to the Past for Alzheimer’s Patients; Creating a Personal Playlist. One of the raps on iPods is that users tend to close themselves off from other people and retreat into their own private world. But
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Shanghai Players Arrive, Driven On by Their Titan
Just over an hour into a rehearsal here last week, the maestro’s baton came down like the crack of a whip, and the music screeched to a halt. Long Yu, the imperious 45-year-old conductor of the Shanghai Symphony Orchestra, wanted
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Nature’s Rejects – The Music of the Castrati
It’s not the pyrotechnic pieces that are the most difficult, Cecilia Bartoli says. “The beautiful sad arias are the hardest to sing, because I am moved almost to tears. I know they were singing those arias out of their own
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